In The Eyes of an Angel Investor

One of the best ways to prepare for a search for startup funding by angel investors is to pretend you are one.  Investors have money they are willing to put into new enterprises, but they also want to minimize their risk as much as possible even with the understanding there is always a certain higher risk associated with a new business. If you consider what you would require if you were investing personal funds, the element of risk becomes much clearer and you can hone in on what information you need to assemble to prove your venture is a good investment.

The truth is that funding requests in the form of business plans submitted to any type of investor, whether for venture capital or to equity partners or to angel investors, should focus on answering questions before they are even asked. So it only makes sense to ask yourself the questions first as if you are investing your own funds.

It can be difficult to look at a new business with an objective eye when you are excited about a new idea, and it’s your business under the microscope.  Looking at the proposal from the angel investor’s viewpoint can help you keep your proposal targeted on the ultimate goal which is new funding.

Question: Am I It?

In the eyes (and mind) of an angel investor approached about a potential investment, your new business is untested.  The initial questions that will arise include:

  • What other potential sources of business funding is available to the new enterprise?
  • Could the startup business find funding through more traditional sources like business loans?
  • How long has the entrepreneur been looking for funding and is there any interest in the project by other investors?
  • Is it possible that several angel investments could be pooled to establish business funding while spreading the risk?
  • Is the entrepreneur asking for funding able to prove that he/she is a legitimate requestor with a solid business plan and not simply an “idea” person who has trouble following through?

These types of questions are just the beginning of a detailed analyzation process. Angel investors considering startup funding will want comprehensive information about projected income and expenses, marketing, project team members, business organization, a SWOT analysis, management, legal matters, future capital needs and more.

Question: Is Break Even in the Picture Anytime Soon?

One of the reasons some entrepreneurs are unable to attract any type of investment including venture capital, equity partners or angel investors is because they have not looked past the initial startup. Lack of capital is one of the main reasons small businesses fail according to the Small Business Administration. In the excitement of bringing a new business idea to the marketplace, the details are overlooked like when will the business break even?

Question: Do You Have Answers Prepared

Pretend you are the investor as you prepare your business plan including the financial section. What would you expect to get answers to before approving any investments or business loans? If your business plan doesn’t answer those questions about your venture then angel investors are going to see the proposal as too risky before it even gets off the ground.

More detailed information and useful advice can be found at http://www.funded.com . Created by Mark Favre, it offers expertise and assistance with developing and funding your concept, including a private forum for queries and discussions. If you need to access a vast network of business people, entrepreneurs, partners and service providers to help you start, finance and run your business, check out http://www.funded.com.

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